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Biodiesel Bulletin
The Biodiesel Bulletin is published monthly by the National Biodiesel Board (NBB).




January 3, 2017  
Cold is No Match for Biodiesel

Harry Potter, Batman, and Biodiesel

Last Call, Biodiesel Conference is Upon Us

Congress Adjourns Without Action on Biodiesel Tax Incentive

Students Selected for Scholarships to Attend Biodiesel Conference

Industry Welcomes Updated Handling and Use Guide

Going Green in the Bluegrass State

RFS Top Ten: Focus on Biodiesel

 

 

Cold is No Match for Biodiesel

Winter is in full swing all across the country with many people dealing with snow, ice and cold temperatures throughout the holidays. Many diesel users are taking extra precautions with their fuel in the cold, and biodiesel is no different.

Like regular diesel fuel, biodiesel can gel in very cold temperatures. However, a few simple steps can ensure that vehicles and equipment operate trouble-free during the harshest winter weather. Bill Carlson, facility manager of Voyageurs National Park in International Falls, MN knows this better than most.

“The first winter we started using a blend of B20,” says Carlson. “We had temperatures of 20 below zero and had no problems with our fuel.”

Voyageurs National Park is located in the “Ice Box of the Nation” along the international border of the US and Canada. Carlson started using biodiesel in 2000, and has not looked back since. The park runs B20 in every vehicle in the park all year long, and even switches some vehicles to B100 in the summer months.

Biodiesel is a great fuel for all seasons, and with just a little knowledge and effort, anyone can ensure that their biodiesel will run perfectly in the cold. Taking simple steps such parking equipment indoors, blending with No. 1 diesel, and using cold flow additives will all help prevent gelling. Follow the link here to learn more about Voyageurs National Park and learn “What you need to know” in order to keep your biodiesel in top shape.

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Harry Potter, Batman, and Biodiesel

Hollywood is going green with more and more focus on sustainability. While many movie studios are looking for the best way to reduce their carbon footprint, Warner Bros. has found their solution with cleaner burning biodiesel. In fact, they have been using a 20 percent blend of biodiesel for six years.

Back in 2009 Warner Bros. installed two 1,000 gallon tanks in order to accommodate their new alternative fueling effort. In 2010 television shows and movies such as “Valentine’s Day” and “Horrible Bosses” began using biodiesel and the studio soon upgraded their equipment to meet greater fuel needs. They had such success with biodiesel that for the 2012-2013 television season, B20 represented 59 percent of all on-lot diesel fueling.

Warner Bros. is not the only studio working on reducing emissions and protecting the environment. On the set of the recent “X-Files” reboot 20th Century Fox enforced a no idling policy and used biodiesel whenever possible. They also recycled more than 80 percent of material waste. The studio managed to save tens of thousands of dollars through their production by going green.

“It takes more effort, but if you’re conscientious about it, you can turn garbage into good purpose,” says X-Files creator Chris Carter. “Every choice on a production is an energy choice.”

Warner Bros. and other studios are really helping to spread the good news about biodiesel. Soon people may even see biodiesel used in the Batmobile, Transformers, or even Harry Potter’s flying car!

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Last Call, Biodiesel Conference is Upon Us

The time to act is now! The 2017 National Biodiesel Conference & Expo is in less than two weeks, kicking off January 16, 2017. This is the biggest biodiesel event of the year, and you won’t want to miss it.

Expanded Renewable Fuel Standard Volumes, a new President taking office in Washington DC, an address from NBB’s new CEO, and much more set the stage for an exciting year, and it all starts at the conference. Previous Biodiesel Bulletins have featured stories about the conference’s exciting location, incredible speakers, and scholarship opportunities for students. Additional information about breakout sessions, the expo hall, and more can all be found on the conference website.

This year’s conference takes place in sunny San Diego, CA at the San Diego Marriott Marquis and Marina where the conference room block has been extended until January 6th. You must act fast though, as over 90 percent of the rooms have already been filled.

The 2017 National Biodiesel Conference & Expo is sure to be one the highlights of the year for the industry, and you will want to be there to witness it firsthand. We hope to see you there, but in case you can’t make it, be sure to follow all the exciting news through the Conference Blog and social media using the hashtag #NB17.

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Congress Adjourns Without Action on Biodiesel Tax Incentive

The biodiesel industry was disappointed to see Congress adjourn for the year without acting to extend the biodiesel tax incentive before it was allowed to lapse on December 31st.

“Thanks to all of our champions in Congress and our stakeholders for their efforts to get this important energy policy extended,” said National Biodiesel Board vice president of federal affairs, Anne Steckel. “We will continue our advocacy efforts as we work towards opportunities for its inclusion in any Congressional action in the new year.” 

Congress has successfully used tax incentives to stimulate domestic energy production for more than 100 years. Since being implemented in 2005, the biodiesel tax incentive has played a key role in stimulating growth in the U.S. biodiesel industry, helping it become the first EPA-designated Advanced Biofuel to reach commercial-scale production nationwide. By helping biodiesel compete on a more level playing field with petroleum, the $1-per-gallon tax credit creates jobs, strengthens U.S. energy security, reduces harmful and costly emissions, diversifies the fuels market, and ultimately lowers costs to the consumer.

There is a clear correlation between the tax incentive and increased biodiesel production, which has grown from about 100 million gallons in 2005, when the tax incentive was first implemented, to a more than 2.5 billion gallon market in 2016. 

However, unlike billions of dollars in petroleum tax incentives written permanently into the tax code, the biodiesel tax incentive faces tremendous uncertainty as Congress has passed short-term extensions and allowed it to temporarily expire repeatedly in recent years.

“With less than a decade of commercial-scale production, biodiesel remains a young and maturing industry that needs stable, long-term tax policy to continue meaningful growth,” Steckel said.

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Students Selected for Scholarships to Attend Biodiesel Conference

Chris Carrie is just one of 14 NGSB students attending the conference this year.

The Next Generation Scientists for Biodiesel program has selected this year’s student scholars to attend the National Biodiesel Conference & Expo. Many of the applicants have direct biodiesel experience in their backgrounds or current research. A total of 14 students will attend from schools worldwide, including Missouri University of Science &Technology, Kansas State University, Newcastle University (UK), Clemson University, Southern Illinois University – Carbondale, University of Iowa, Rowan University, University of Nevada – Reno, North Carolina State University and Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (Quebec).

Many of these students will present posters on their research, and a few of those students have been selected to present in a student-led breakout session. The National Biodiesel Board leads the NGSB program, designed to foster collaboration and increase awareness of scientific facts about biodiesel at universities and colleges. This year’s scholarship program is funded by the United Soybean Board and the soybean checkoff, the National Biodiesel Foundation and a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant.

The Next Generation Scientists for Biodiesel program is always looking for bright young minds interested in sustainability and biodiesel. For more information and to join please visit the website.

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Industry Welcomes Updated Handling and Use Guide

The U.S. Department of Energy recently released the fifth edition of the Biodiesel Handling and Use Guide, developed in conjunction with the DOE Clean Cities Program. This guide is a comprehensive document designed to educate and provide basic information on the proper safety and use of biodiesel to fleets, blenders, distributors, and anyone else using biodiesel fuels.

“This guide is an important tool for the industry as we see biodiesel volumes in the marketplace continue to grow,” said Scott Fenwick, technical director at the National Biodiesel Board. “More American’s are using biodiesel than ever before, and reliable, accurate information is critical for the fuel supply chain all the way down to end users.”

The fifth edition of this guide brings about much needed updates, as the fourth edition was published in 2008. In that time the biodiesel industry has grown by more than 1.3 billion gallons with biodiesel blends reaching many new market sectors.

The Biodiesel Handling and Use Guide is prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The newest version is available for free online. Download it by following the link here or by visiting the Clean Cities website.

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Going Green in the Bluegrass State

As temperatures cool and environmental concerns heat up, the Kentucky Petroleum Marketers Association is launching a statewide campaign to promote and educate consumers about a sustainable home heating oil alternative – Bioheat®.

Comprised of a 2 percent to 5 percent blend of biodiesel with standard heating oil, Bioheat® is clean burning and highly efficient. The alternative fuel is endorsed by the Oil Manufacturers Association, touts impressive reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, and can be used in any standard home heating system. Bioheat® also strengthens the U.S. job market and lessens our dependence on foreign oil.

Driving Kentucky’s Bioheat® campaign is a fleet of locally owned oil trucks wrapped in the Bioheat® logo and website: www.heatingkentucky.com. These trucks will deliver environmentally friendly Bioheat® across the state throughout the New Year.

The first Bioheat® branded truck to hit the road is owned by Woodford Oil in Danville, KY. Scott Hacker, Woodford’s Regional Manager, is excited about the company’s participation in the campaign.

“We are very pleased with the final look of the truck,” stated Hacker. “The design is colorful and provides local companies with an exciting and innovative way to promote Bioheat® to Kentucky customers.”

In addition to the wrapped trucks, KPMA is also promoting Bioheat® with local feature stories and statewide media outreach efforts.

To learn more about Bioheat® and KPMA, visit www.kpma.org.

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RFS Top Ten: Focus on Biodiesel

The Renewable Fuel Standard continues to drive growth in the biodiesel industry. To showcase that success, here is a “Top Ten” list of facts and figures that show why everyone should support the RFS.

1. The Renewable Fuel Standard drives billions of dollars of economic activity in the U.S. and brings clean, renewable fuels to American drivers. 

2. Biodiesel replaces imported diesel fuel to help drive economic growth here at home.

3. Biodiesel has driven RFS success and is the only large-scale, commercially available advanced biofuel.

4. The biodiesel industry is growing, with about 200 plants across the country in nearly every state from California to Maine.

5. Biodiesel is made in the USA! The domestic biodiesel industry has the registered capacity to produce some 3 billion gallons of fuel from readily available resources.

6. The industry also supports nearly 48,000 American jobs, generating billions of dollars in GDP, household income and tax revenues.

7. Biodiesel is an environmental leader. Since the creation of the RFS, biodiesel has cut carbon pollution by 93.7 million metric tons.

8. This national investment in biodiesel has the same impact as removing more than 19.7 million passenger vehicles from America’s roadways.

9. Biodiesel reduces pollution because it burns clean: the EPA determined that biodiesel reduces carbon emissions from 57 percent to 86 percent. 

10. Finally, biodiesel sharply reduces major tailpipe pollutants from older diesel vehicles. EPA consistently cites diesel exhaust from older trucks, buses and vehicles as one of the nation's most dangerous pollutants.

 

For the latest issue of Biodiesel Magazine click here.

 

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