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Biodiesel Bulletin
The Biodiesel Bulletin is published monthly by the National Biodiesel Board (NBB).




March 1, 2017  
Take Action and Support Biodiesel Today

Senators Say the Renewable Fuel Standard Works

Biodiesel is Demonstrating Sustainability

The Oliver Hazard Perry Sets Sail with Biodiesel

Whitehead Named NBB COO

Biodiesel Conference Returning to Fort Worth in 2018

Foundation Prioritizes Research Needs

 

 
Take Action and Support Biodiesel Today

The National Biodiesel Board has begun a new grassroots advocacy campaign intended to urge members of Congress to support important biodiesel initiatives in Washington, DC.

American biodiesel has many legislative and regulatory priorities, and continued support in Congress is critical. With the beginning of the new Congress, it is important to reach out and let your congressional representatives hear your voice.

The grassroots campaign takes less than 30 seconds, and all biodiesel supporters are encouraged to participate. To join the effort click here, enter your information, and hit the send function to direct an email to your representatives in Congress. NBB also encourages supporters to add specific details about their connection to the industry in the customizable letter. This helps emphasize the importance of the American biodiesel industry to local communities. This campaign will combine the voices of industry veterans and new supporters to remind Congress of biodiesel’s priorities.

While the NBB federal affairs team works with allies on Capitol Hill and inside the new Administration, communication from biodiesel supporters from across the country is critical to expanding the American biodiesel industry. For more information, be sure to visit the Fueling Action site.

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 Senators Say the Renewable Fuel Standard Works

A bipartisan group of Senators sent a letter to the Trump Administration last month urging continued support of the Renewable Fuel Standard. The RFS is a bipartisan law passed by congress which the Environmental Protection Agency administers and sets the yearly volume requirements. The RFS allowed US consumers to see a record of almost 2.9 billion gallons of biodiesel and renewable diesel in 2016, outpacing the previous record by almost 40 percent.

“In 2015, the RFS added $44 billion in economic activity,” the letter states. “This is felt throughout greater America as farmers produce larger harvests to meet fuel demand. In turn, equipment manufacturers produce more efficient farm machinery, and truckers are relied on to move products. Engineers at ethanol and biodiesel facilities across the nation produce the most cost-effective biofuels in the world, lowering gas prices for all Americans and bringing high-paying jobs to rural areas.”

According to a study conducted by LMC International, a 2.9 billion gallon biodiesel and renewable diesel market divided between domestic and foreign supply supports about 64,000 U.S. jobs and $11.42 billion in total impact.

The RFS has support from both sides of the party line which will help lead it towards a bright and healthy future. By creating jobs and bolstering the economy, the RFS is proving that it works, and will continue to help America fuel its future.

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Biodiesel is Demonstrating Sustainability

Sustainability is defined as the quality of not being harmful to the environment or depleting natural resources, and thereby supporting long-term ecological balance. Biodiesel encapsulates each of these aspects through its environmental benefits, its positive impact on the nation’s food supply, and in the way that it creates energy independence.

Throughout 2016, biodiesel reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent compared to petroleum diesel. Cleaner emissions from biodiesel have amazing health benefits such as preventing hundreds of premature deaths and saving billions of dollars by reducing respiratory illness.

Additionally, rather than releasing the carbon from fossil fuels back into the atmosphere, biodiesel uses energy from the sun. The sun provides energy to plants like soybeans, which produce the oil necessary to make biodiesel. By using vegetable oil biodiesel also helps the food supply.

“You can’t make a gallon of biodiesel from soybean oil without also putting 30 pounds of soy protein and 22 pounds of carbohydrates into the food supply,” says Don Scott, NBB Director of Sustainability. “When we grow protein to feed the world, we get more fats and carbohydrates than we can eat since zero percent of the protein grown for food goes into biofuels.  Food and biofuels go together to help provide affordable protein for the world.”

Biodiesel helps the environment through reducing harmful emissions, and it sustains natural resources by using solar energy and increasing the amount of protein in the food supply. America’s advanced biofuel clearly demonstrates its sustainability and continues to provide benefits from coast to coast.

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The Oliver Hazard Perry Sets Sail with Biodiesel

It has been 100 years since a fully rigged ocean-going ship has been built in the U.S—until now. The Oliver Hazard Perry Rhode Island has the profile of a 19th century vessel, yet inside the Newport-based ship lies a modern state-of-the-art floating classroom to host leadership activities and practical sail training.

The innovation doesn’t stop there. Newport Biodiesel, a local biodiesel producer, provided 6,000 gallons of B20 at a discounted rate to fuel its maiden voyage. The OHPRI will set sail this month, transporting high school and college explorers from New England, to Florida, and then on to Cuba.

“Supplying this ship with B20 biodiesel gives us a chance to support a worthwhile seafaring mission, while educating the public and marine industry about the environmental benefits of B20,” said Robert Morton, chairman of the board for Newport Biodiesel. “This is the largest deployment of B20 we have ever done for a marine vessel, so it represents a significant step.”

However, one question remains: why would a ship with sails need fuel? Jess Wurzbacker, Executive Director of OHPRI, cleared the confusion in a recent interview.

“Despite having 20 sails and 14,000 square feet of sail area, there will certainly be times when Perry will need to use engines as she covers an estimated 14,000 nautical miles on her journeys this year,” Wurzbacker said. “As mariners tied so closely to the ocean and appreciative of its value, we are pleased to be able to reduce pressure on non-renewable resources. We are thankful to our Marine Trade Partner Newport Biodiesel for helping us keep our commitment to being as green as possible.”

The OHPRI is named in memory of U.S Navy Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry who led the first U.S Naval victory over the British in the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812.

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 Whitehead Named NBB COO

The National Biodiesel Board has announced a new second in command in its executive leadership team. Doug Whitehead, formerly the Director of Operations, was recently promoted to Chief Operating Officer.

In his 10 years of service to NBB, Whitehead managed planning, implementation, administration and reporting for all contracts for funding and subcontracting. He was also responsible for recruiting new members and communicating with current members.

“Doug has admirably served the biodiesel industry in his various roles at NBB over the years and his experience and expertise in operations, membership, strategic thinking, and management uniquely position us to continue our growth as an organization and as an industry,” said NBB CEO Donnell Rehagen. “His deep understanding of the day-to-day operations of the organization allow us to continue serving or members in a highly effective, efficient way as a member association.”

NBB’s continual effort to grow the biodiesel industry can be plainly seen in the numbers. During 2016 alone, the production and distribution of 2.9 billion gallons of biodiesel and renewable diesel supported 64,000 U.S jobs and contributed $11.42 billion to the U.S economy.

“I’m extremely excited to serve the biodiesel industry in my new executive role with NBB,” said Whitehead. “We have a tremendous team that is committed to growing the market for America’s advanced biofuel. It will be critical to continue to face our challenges head on to maintain our more than 2-billion gallon market share.”

NBB is the US trade association representing the entire biodiesel value chain, including producers, feedstock suppliers, fuel distributers, and the US renewable diesel industry. Included in its membership are 150 companies and organizations.

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 Biodiesel Conference Returning to Fort Worth in 2018

The National Biodiesel Conference & Expo returns to the South next year as the biodiesel event of the year is announced for Fort Worth, Texas January 22-25, 2018. Plan now to join in as the industry gets down to the business of biodiesel and celebrates 25 years of America’s Advanced Biofuel!

Educational sessions, keynote speeches, and industry announcements are the foundation of the annual event, but the business meetings and deals that get done throughout the week remain the highlight for many attendees.

“Attendees surveyed year after year rank the business opportunities and networking the conference provides as their number one motivation for attending,” said conference director Doug Whitehead. “Walk through the expo hall, the numerous boardrooms, receptions, and local restaurants and you will see deals getting done throughout the week. If you are serious in the business of biodiesel this is the place you need to be.”

Attendees of the 2017 conference represented biodiesel producers, marketers, distributors, the automotive industry, the petroleum supply chain, feedstock suppliers, technology providers, academia, Clean Cities coordinators, and more.

To hear speeches, see photos, and read news announcements from the 2017 event visit the conference blog here. Conference registration will open online later this year.

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 Foundation Prioritizes Research Needs

The National Biodiesel Foundation recently conducted its second biennial Sustainability and Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) Workshop, hosted by the Monsanto Company Corporate. The workshop gathered 30 of the world’s leading emissions sustainability scholars to identify and prioritize projects that will improve the accuracy of ILUC modeling and sustainability comparisons between biofuels and fossil fuels.

“We are proud of the reduced ILUC scores that have been achieved for biodiesel through investment in better science, but the scope of these workshop activities is not limited to biodiesel policy,” explained Tom Verry, the executive director of the Foundation. “Our directors see ILUC as a critical factor in advancing all forms of renewable energy, biobased products, sustainable food production, and the bioeconomy. Optimizing land use and renewable resources is key to sustaining and improving the quality of life for the global population and future generations.”

The workshop served as a forum to review recent progress in improving ILUC models and continue building momentum toward defining the critical impacts of advancing bioenergy fuels. NBF seeks to achieve cleaner air, greater economic development for rural communities, and enhanced national security through energy independence.

“Identifying appropriate land inventories and farmers’ abilities to increase efficiency in conjunction with system-wide optimization of crop production, livestock rearing, and food consumption are all necessary to promote responsible growth of biofuels,” said Don Scott, National Biodiesel Board Sustainability Director.

More details on the workshop and a list of the research priorities identified through this collaborative workshop can be found online.

 

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For the latest issue of Biodiesel Magazine click here.

 

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